National Geographic

Life Magnified

If you travel through Dulles Airport in the near future, you may see some lovely scientific images on the walls. It’s an exhibit called “Life: Magnified,” organized by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, the American Society for Cell Biology and the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority’s Arts Program. If you aren’t passing through Dulles, you can see the images on the web.

Here are a few of my favorites. You can see high-resolution versions on the web site, plus many others.

First, the mouthparts of a Lone Star tick (an awesome beast):

Mouth parts of a lone star tick. Igor Siwanowicz, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, Va.

Igor Siwanowicz, Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, Va.

Neurons in the cerebellum, a region of the brain:

Thomas Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San Diego

Thomas Deerinck, National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, University of California, San Diego

HIV (yellow) attacks an immune cell (blue):

Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

Seth Pincus, Elizabeth Fischer and Austin Athman, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health

New yeast emerge after two yeast cells have sex:

Juergen Berger, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, and Maria Langegger, Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Germany

Juergen Berger, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, and Maria Langegger, Friedrich Miescher Laboratory of the Max Planck Society, Germany

Hairs on a gecko lizard’s toes, allowing them to stick to walls:

Dennis Kunkel, Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc.

Dennis Kunkel, Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc.

An ovary from an anglerfish:

James E. Hayden, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pa.

James E. Hayden, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pa.

 

There are 11 Comments. Add Yours.

  1. David Bump
    June 8, 2014

    Glorious! Kudos! Encore!

  2. Stanley Von Medvey
    June 8, 2014

    This is a different world , fantastic.

  3. Remondo Hodges
    June 8, 2014

    Amazing how the system of life prompts humans for studying the professional study of medicine.

  4. Susan
    June 9, 2014

    Fantastic! There is so much we cannot see and appreciate without these kinds of images.

  5. Don Ross
    June 9, 2014

    When studying histo pathology I felt many microscopic preparations would make impressive art works.

  6. omed
    June 9, 2014

    magnificent, untouched and undiscovered landscape in human body.

  7. Fred floon
    June 9, 2014

    The world is charged with the grandeur God, it will flame out like the shining from shook foil, it gathers to a greatness, like the ooze of oil, crushed.
    G M Hopkins got it right….

  8. Dale Yuzuki
    June 10, 2014

    As a scientist who constantly travels out of IAD this is fabulous! Looking forward to seeing this collection.

  9. Daniel Norm
    June 10, 2014

    Vraiment magnifique,

    encore plus…
    Daniel

  10. Melissa Carvalho
    June 11, 2014

    Thank you for your support! Cellular Biology with an Integrative Physiology was the most dynamic thought I could have ever visualized. I love microscopes lol. #dicpics #neuroscience #ions #channels #NIH #UCF

  11. Rita Weber
    June 13, 2014

    To see a world in a grain of sand,
    And a heaven in a wildflower,
    Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
    And eternity in an hour.
    William Blake

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