His and Her Science Tattoos

his and her

“The atom is on the left shoulder of Raychelle Burks, chemistry PhD candidate at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. She got the tattoo upon turning 18 and deciding to pursue a career in science. She got the tattoo in her hometown of Pomona, CA at The Body Shop. The Chinese characters tattoo says “Scientist” and is on the left ankle of Matthew Shortridge, chemistry PhD candidate at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. He got the tattoo upon turning 18 and deciding to pursue a career in science. He got the tattoo in his hometown of Lincoln, NE at Aavardaxx’s Tattoo. They met years later at UNL, started dating in the Fall of 2006, and soon learned they both had science tattoos. Two nerds meant to be together.”–Raychelle Burks

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0 thoughts on “His and Her Science Tattoos

  1. Unfortunately, the third chinese character is wrong. the phrase says ‘ke xue zhe’ when it should say ‘ke xue jia’. Taken individually, the words make sense, but put together, the phrase doesn’t. Sorry!

  2. Hahaha that’s what happens when you get a cliche Chinese characters tat. They’re almost always not correct. Why would he choose Chinese characters to represent “science” anyway? The universal Latin would make a bit more sense.

  3. You do know that uh.. ‘scientist’ in Chinese is 科学*家* not 者 (ke xue JIA instead of ke xue ZHE)

  4. Commenting on an old entry here.

    But just to set things straight, 科学者 (kagakusha) really does mean “scientist”. Not in Chinese, but in _Japanese_.

    I guess that’s what happens when you comment on things without double checking first. Sorry! 😉

  5. “But just to set things straight, 科学者 (kagakusha) really does mean “scientist”. Not in Chinese, but in _Japanese_.
    I guess that’s what happens when you comment on things without double checking first. Sorry!”
    You’re right, but the entry does say that it’s Chinese, “The Chinese characters tattoo says “Scientist” and is on the left ankle of Matthew Shortridge, chemistry PhD candidate at the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. ”
    So the original commenter was correct, but the person posting that entry (Raychelle I guess) was not.

  6. Yes, and Japanese uses Chinese characters, just like English uses the Latin alphabet and Farsi uses Arabic script. The orthography may be Chinese, but the language is Japanese. Everyone is wrong and right at the same time. Now stop.

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